Reading Festival 2013: The headliners | Feature | Music

Reading 2013After months of teasing, Festival Republic have now revealed all three headliners for Reading and Leeds 2013, along with a handful of other names. Green Day, Eminem and Biffy Clyro are confirmed as the three big-hitters for what is, for many, the festival highlight of the year.

The question is, will they be any good?

The struggling pop punk heroes

TréGreen Day have not had an easy time of it. The band were forced to pull out of a recent US tour after leading man Billy Joe Armstrong was taken into rehab for drug dependency. This forced a swift and apologetic release of Tré – the third album released by the trio in the past year, with the first in the trilogy being imaginatively titled Uno and Dos.

After the height of success in 2004 and 2005 with American Idiot, the last time they headlined the main stage (even before the multi-million selling album was released), the band have been fighting hard to remain relevant.

Young up-starts like All Time Low and heavier alternatives like The Blackout have got the attention of the pop crowd. On the hardcore punk side, the sort of bands who dominate well-known punk institutions such as The Warped Tour, bands like The Wonder Years, Such Gold and Man Overboard keep the momentum of the genre without the highly polished production.

What is undeniable though is that the band did make a massive impression at their secret performance at Reading last year, and Billy Joe’s reputation for strong showmanship is well-founded. It remains to be seen whether the band have any new ideas to bring to the table as a headliner.

The wildcard act

EminemRappers have not had a great time at Reading in past years. 50 Cent famously got bottled off after 20 minutes, and Jay-Z didn’t even arrive, cancelling shortly before the event began.

Marshall Mathers III, has been quiet in recent years, with only ‘Crack a Bottle’, ‘Beautiful’ and ‘We Made You’ reaching the UK singles chart (and that was in 2009, four years ago). The days of ‘The Real Slim Shady’ and ‘Stan’ are behind him, making this a comeback gig.

Eminem has a lot stacked against him to get a rock audience on side, perhaps we can expect a rapped up rock cover or two? To win this audience, which will have its collective eyebrow firmly raised, Mathers will need all the excitement and atmosphere a live show can bring.

Despite the seemingly bleak setting, it’s worth remembering that Eminem is reportedly the biggest selling artist of the 2000s, and it’s likely everyone at the festival weekend will have heard at least one of his songs, if not three or four.

The more restrained image Eminem gives off these days may make him appear a bit more grown up, but this isn’t necessarily good for Reading. Clearly a big star in the pop world, Eminem has little foothold in ‘rock’ as a genre, with the fun tracks released as his alter ego Slim Shady being the most rock-friendly of the lot.

The man is absolutely there to promote his new album, rumoured to be coming out after Memorial Day in the US (the final Monday of May), but is he there for much else? You can’t expect a love poem to Reading like nice-guy Dave Grohl gave with Foo Fighters‘ set last year. Although he has had one previous headline performance, in 2001.

The Scotch alternative rockers

Biffy ClyroThese are the guys you should be definitely excited about. Biffy have played Reading on and off for the past 12 years, debuting on the smallest stage you could come across and working their way to the top through seven performances.

Latest album Opposites has gone down well with critics, and the band’s tour this year sold out in minutes. Things have never looked stronger for the band which began with Blackened Sky back in 2002.

To be trending up is a good thing, and immediately makes the group worthy of the highly sought-after Sunday night slot, which historically runs for another 20 minutes longer than the other nights.

Hits like ‘Bubbles’ and ‘Mountain’ scream for a further festival outing, and new tracks like ‘Black Chandelier’ are ripe to be picked by an eager and hungry audience.

The stage presence from the band has slowly risen over the years, to a level which is fit to explode and potentially blow the roof off the festival. As great as last year was, you can’t help but think that it was all a bit predictable. Hopefully with this mix of styles between the three nights there should at least be a nice breadth and variety to proceedings.

And still many more yet to come

Another one to watch for the weekend, and one which really shows that this is a festival with its finger on the pulse, is Skrillex, but expect more on him and the rest of the line up once more bands have been announced. For now, plenty of time to acquaint (or re-acquaint) yourself with the titular trios’ back catalogues.

Here’s what we have to look forward to:

James Michael Parry

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3 thoughts on “Reading Festival 2013: The headliners | Feature | Music”

  1. Sorry, still all very Radio 1 bland…
    Where are the “Must See” bands? the “OMG I Can’t wait to see” bands? the guaranteed stadium crowd pleasers? It’s all very “indie ghetto” and pales in comparison with the line ups for Coachella or any US festival where they can mix genres and ages with impunity… Where are the ROCK bands, the Funky blues bands? Sorry, Reading Festival is a pale imitator of itself.
    just look at the line ups for 1980 to 1999…
    Or is it that I’m getting old?
    :)

    1. I always think it pales in comparison to its legacy to be honest. It’s not the big names I go for though, it’s the people I haven’t heard of. Lower Than Atlantis were the band I discovered last year having not heard of them and a fair few bands which I’m big fans of now began there for me.

      But yes, you are getting old ;-)

  2. There are some truly awesome acts playing at Reading and Leeds but I have to question whether there has been much thought put into building a cohesive lineup – it seems as though they’ve just come up with a list of acts, stuck them all together and assumed that would make a great festival – but festivals have to appear to groups of people and not just try to appeal to everyone otherwise you risk appealing to no one!

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